Wednesday, March 21, 2007

Comment Madness!

Update: I have found much better foil board video, and some great footage of the Hiller Flying Platform.

Amba had a post this morning where she asked:

Pogonotomy.
What do you think it means? Don't look it up! Guess, or make it up. Put it in the comments. Then you can go here.
I had a rather elaborate answer. But unfortunately, the number of links embedded in my comment triggered her spam filter, so I can't post it there. So, without further ado, here is my answer:
Pogonotomy is a field of study (combining physics and game theory) dedicated to the game Pog.

Alternately, it is the study of unstable devices of locomotion, such as this, or this, or this. (Slightly more about the last item here.)

My favorite type of such travel is the Hiller Flying Platform, seen here. (I highly recommend reading the linked stuff from the Wiki.) I keep thinking that the same tech used in Segway might help with the flying platform concept, but I'm probably over thinking the issue.
Now I'm going to attempt to find some video footage of the Hiller Flying Platform in action.

(Found it!
Yes!)

The HFP was the coolest invention ever until this came along. Here's some excellent footage of foilboarding, from the movie Step Into Liquid.

9 comments:

Icepick said...

And I'm definitely overthinking the HFP stuff. It doesn't need any more stability, which is the beauty of it.

Pastor_Jeff said...

Whoa. I'd never seen that before. The HFP is totally awesome. I'd use one before a foilboard (cool as that is).

I've always been fascinated with this kind of crazy DARPA stuff. There was just something about the 50s and 60s that inspired these "Why the hell not?" ideas.

Thanks for sharing. It's this kind of random, cool stuff that makes the internet endlessly fascinating.

Icepick said...

I've always been fascinated with this kind of crazy DARPA stuff. There was just something about the 50s and 60s that inspired these "Why the hell not?" ideas.

Thanks for sharing. It's this kind of random, cool stuff that makes the internet endlessly fascinating.


Agreed! Of course, the internet itself is one of those inspired "Why the hell not?" DARPA projects, so it's only just that we use the internet to show other cool projects that grew out of the same spirit.

bill said...

That reminded me to check--I can't believe the Ron Jon Surf Park is still not open. Wish they'd built one of those in downtown Atlanta instead of the whale killing aquarium we got.

Pastor_Jeff said...

Apropos of nothing (except comment madness), I saw all the AD&D manuals listed in the the library thing at kim's blog.

I assume they're yours? 'Cuz I still had the same late 70s editions myself until a few years ago.

Icepick said...

Yep, they're mine. All of them except the DM Guide's are the original's that I bought back in the day. (I'm not sure what happened to my original DM Guide, but I think someone permanently 'borrowed' it.)

My wife is somewhat bitter about the D&D thing, though. For some reason, when she tried to play the game way back when, the guys wouldn't let her play "Because you're a girl!" In the groups I played with we would have KILLED to have girls included. I don't know what their problem was.

I never expect to play again, and I'm not under the illusion that they will be worth anything, but maybe some day we'll have children, and they'll discover them on some back shelf in the house. Of course, they'll probably just laugh and ask why we didn't play MORPGs. And I'll have to explain back in my day, we didn't have the internet OR global warming. And we had to walk to school in the snow, hoping we could avoid the sabre tooth tigers and the rabid mamooth. And then I'll show them my 20 sided die....

Icepick said...

Oh, and we're still taggin the books, but anything with a DW is hers, and anything with a DH is mine.

Pastor_Jeff said...

If not for space issues, it would have been nice to hang on to some of that stuff. The kids would have at least thought the dice were cool.

But the pile I got rid of was much larger than one you've cataloged -- a couple of years of Dragon magazine, all the original AD&D books, dozens of adventure modules, several TSR and Steve Jackson minigames...

Okay, I'm stopping here because I'm starting to frighten myself.

We did have one girl in our gaming group, but we would have loved more.

And I like the idea of cataloging all the books in our house, but even excluding the kids' books, it would be a massive job. A few years ago I created an Excel spreadsheet just for my work-related books at the office. I'm at 500 and growing.

justkim said...

To be fair to the D&D boys I knew (not that they deserve much in the way of fairness), we were only 10 or so at the time. I still had girl cooties.

I didn't know any guys in high school that played, or, rather, acknowledged they played. I suspect the stage tech guys played.