Thursday, December 27, 2007

The Stupid, it burns!

Two bits of stupidity from the last few days, both courtesy of MSM-types. (Stupidity certainly isn't limited to MSM-types, but they have the biggest platform, so we're more aware of it.)

First up is Peter King, a senior NFL correspondent for Sports Illustrated. In his Monday Morning Quarterback column this week he wrote the following stupidity:

I think the more football I watch, the more I think I was too hasty last summer when I said the NFL should go to a 17-game schedule. This year hasn't been any more injury-plagued than any other; but late in the season, when fatigued players continue to drop (three Dallas starters went out in the first half alone Saturday night), you get a different view of injuries and how they affect teams than you do in July. [emphasis added]
Okay, Peter, I'm glad this season has given you added perspective on how a long season wears down football players, making them more susceptible to injury. Why this occurred to you after the TWENTY-EIGHTH season you've covered the NFL professionally, and not after the prior twenty-seven seasons remains a mystery. Perhaps you've written without a helmet too many times?

Next up is Andrew Sullivan, currently blogging for his supper at The Atlantic. Reacting to the Bhutto assassination, he writes:
[G]iven the deep and broad forces behind Islamism, and given its record in actually trying to govern countries, it's worth reminding ourselves not to be too intimidated by religious fundamentalist losers. As Iran shows, it doesn't take too long for Muslims to see that mullahs can't run anything halfway competently.
Yeah, it's amazing how those Iranians got sick of the mullahs and threw them out of power so quickly. Oh, wait a minute, that hasn't happened. After almost 29 years, the mullahs are still safely ensconced as the rulers of Iran. I guess Sullivan missed that detail somehow.

The Stupid, it really does burn....

1 comment:

Bill_45 said...

when fatigued players continue to drop (three Dallas starters went out in the first half alone Saturday night), you get a different view of injuries and how they affect teams than you do in July.

Which is why a carefully controlled, monitored, and administered (by actual physicians) program of performance enhancing drugs may increase the quality of play while also keeping the players healthier.